Need help with restoring Image backup.

Ozzie

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I updated my Windows 10 to Windows 11 and did my usual Windows Image backup to my portable USB drive. I had to convert to UEFI from legacy boot to update to Win 11. Now my Windows System Repair disk(DVD) won't boot. I have ASUS P9H77-M motherboard. The bios sees the DVD drive and labels it UEFI. Anyone have any idea what may be going on.
 
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I updated my Windows 10 to Windows 11 and did my usual Windows Image backup to my portable USB drive. I had to convert to UEFI from legacy boot to update to Win 11. Now my Windows System Repair disk(DVD) won't boot. I have ASUS P9H77-M motherboard. The bios sees the DVD drive and labels it UEFI. Anyone have any idea what may be going on.
I finally solved my windews image backup problem. I'm using the free version of AOME Backupper on my three Win 11 machines without a hitch. AOME uses Win PE to boot. It doesn't care about TPM or Windows secure mode.
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Grizzly

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You answered your question already yourself
I had to convert to UEFI from legacy boot to update to Win 11
The system repair disk is most likely made in legacy mode and not in UEFI or combo mode. You can return your BIOS back to legacy to make the repair disk booting again, however it will not be able to fix anything since your OS is in UEFI mode.

One question though: What is your boot sequence?? if the DVD is labeled UEFI, it should boot up unless it is not the first drive. The DVD has to come BEFORE the HDD/SSD.
 

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Ozzie

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You answered your question already yourself

The system repair disk is most likely made in legacy mode and not in UEFI or combo mode. You can return your BIOS back to legacy to make the repair disk booting again, however it will not be able to fix anything since your OS is in UEFI mode.

One question though: What is your boot sequence?? if the DVD is labeled UEFI, it should boot up unless it is not the first drive. The DVD has to come BEFORE the HDD/SSD.
Thanks for your reply. I'm still a bit confused about this. Currently my bios shows the cd in uefi mode as the first boot then my ssd in uefi mode as second boot. Should I be able to create a new Windows Repair Disk and do a new Image backup to make this work.
 

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Callistemon

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You can return your BIOS back to legacy to make the repair disk booting again, however it will not be able to fix anything since your OS is in UEFI mode.
DVDs and USB pen drives with legacy Windows media can be used for repairing or reinstalling UEFI Windows on the HDD or SSD. UEFI media is much preferable as it is less susceptible to error codes while choosing which HDD to install to, but legacy has the ability work as well. In this case, it is restoring legacy Windows, so the current Windows 11 isn't irrelevant as it is being entirely replaced.

Currently my bios shows the cd in uefi mode as the first boot then my ssd in uefi mode as second boot.
The BIOS shows it in Legacy mode because the CD/DVD drive is set to Legacy boot mode. It doesn't display the type of the actual optical disc inside, what it should use, instead it displays what mode it currently is set.

Should I be able to create a new Windows Repair Disk and do a new Image backup to make this work.
It'd be better to switch BIOS mode to Legacy and use the existing disc. Yes, you can use a Windows 11 DVD to restore Windows 10 without problem, but once Windows 10 is restored, you will need to switch the BIOS mode to Legacy anyway, since that is what it used.
 

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Ozzie

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I don't want to switch back to Windows 10. Do you have any idea how I can switch back to legacy mode in my bios. It is the the original bios on my ASUS P*H77-M MB. There are so many options it's very confusing.
 

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Grizzly

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DVDs and USB pen drives with legacy Windows media can be used for repairing or reinstalling UEFI Windows on the HDD or SSD.
I do not think so. I have usb sticks created as MBR (With Rufus) and they will NOT be recognized by a pc setup as UEFI. They will however recognize a SSD that is partitioned as GPT.

Do you have any idea how I can switch back to legacy mode in my bios

Why would you do that?? Windows 11 requires UEFI to run instead of legacy. MS wants to get rid of the legacy mode altogether in the future. Windows 11 will work in legacy mode only with certain registry hacks.
 

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Callistemon

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I don't want to switch back to Windows 10. Do you have any idea how I can switch back to legacy mode in my bios. It is the the original bios on my ASUS P*H77-M MB. There are so many options it's very confusing.
If the backup image is from Windows 10, you'll be switched back to Windows 10 when restoring it, which will use legacy boot mode. Please post an image of your BIOS settings if you can't find the boot mode.

If the backup image was created after Windows 11 was installed, then you should leave the BIOS mode in UEFI, or else it will not boot Windows 11. In this case, if the backup image is Windows 11, create a new recovery DVD with Windows 11, in UEFI format, and leave the BIOS mode as UEFI.
 

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Callistemon

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I do not think so. I have usb sticks created as MBR (With Rufus) and they will NOT be recognized by a pc setup as UEFI. They will however recognize a SSD that is partitioned as GPT.
If it's strictly UEFI mode without CSM support, then MBR installers can't be accessed without switching into Legacy mode. Many have CSM support for USB, even when the internal HDDs are strictly UEFI. If it's possible to enter a legacy USB or DVD, then it has the ability to be used with UEFI Windows, if it can be accessed.
 

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Callistemon

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Converting from MBR to GPT should only be done with basic data, such as external HDDs. If Windows was installed in Legacy MBR mode, it will have the bootloader partition as System Reserved set as active. If Windows was installed in UEFI GPT mode, it will have the bootloader partition in an EFI partition with a GUID identifier of C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B.

If the Legacy bootloader partition is on a disk converted to GPT, it will not be set as active, as GPT does not support setting partitions as active. If the EFI bootloader partition is on a disk converted to MBR, it will not have the correct GUID identifier. The System Reserved partition can't just be converted to an EFI partition with the correct GUID, and then rebuilt with EFI bootloader files, because a UEFI installation of Windows has the System Reserved along with a separate EFI partition. Adding another partition alongside Reserved would require shrinking the large Primary from the beginning. Switching Windows between MBR and GPT is best done by reformatting and reinstalling.

The BIOS should be switched to Legacy boot mode if a system image backup of Windows 10 is to be restored. If Windows 10 needs to be in UEFI mode, then it'll need to be reinstalled independent from the backup. If the backup is of Windows 11, no conversion is necessary, and only a new recovery DVD is needed.
 

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Ozzie

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I updated my Windows 10 to Windows 11 and did my usual Windows Image backup to my portable USB drive. I had to convert to UEFI from legacy boot to update to Win 11. Now my Windows System Repair disk(DVD) won't boot. I have ASUS P9H77-M motherboard. The bios sees the DVD drive and labels it UEFI. Anyone have any idea what may be going on.
I finally solved my windews image backup problem. I'm using the free version of AOME Backupper on my three Win 11 machines without a hitch. AOME uses Win PE to boot. It doesn't care about TPM or Windows secure mode.
.
 

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